At the Coliving Coworking SEE (South East Europe) Conference, the Prime Minister of Serbia, Ana Brnabić, announced a new tax incentive to attract digital nomads. As part of the newly launched Serbia Creates campaign, the government is supporting programs, funding and new educational standards.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution

In her opening remarks at CCC SEE, the Prime Minister quoted a “fourth industrial revolution”. Referencing larger countries such as the United States that have experienced success in innovation, she identified the opportunity for smaller countries to participate in a new revolution and evolution of work.

Prime Minister of Serbia

By updating educational standards to include coding and programming, Serbia is actively preparing their population for this new industrial revolution. The government is also working to attract startups, research programs and creatives through a variety of initiatives.

Serbian Tax Incentives for Digital Nomads

A new demographic which Serbia is now looking to attract is digital nomads. The Prime Minister announced that starting in 2020 the Serbian government will be rolling out a new tax incentive. This first iteration will offer digital nomads a zero tax rate for income earned while working in Serbia (for a set amount of time – 90 days).

This announcement is quite exciting as part of a larger trend of governments beginning to acknowledge the importance of creating policies and incentive for remote workers and digital nomads.

Hub of Creativity

Serbia is one of many smaller countries experiencing a growth in coworking and coliving. Providing a more affordable cost of living while not sacrificing culture, lifestyle or internet connectivity, Serbia is home to popular coworking spaces such as Smart Office. Coliving has also begun to take off, including Mokrin House, which has been recognized by Forbes as one of the top 5 locations for digital nomads.

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Zac Stafford
Guest

I’m not sure how this is much of an incentive- I can stay in Serbia for 90 days and not pay local tax as it is.

A true benefit would be to offer better visa for longer stays, and easier residency for foreigners.

Full time travel since 2015
http://www.Visa-vis.com

Keith from Nomad Flag
Guest

As long as my business is not based in Serbia and I don’t deal with local companies, I shouldn’t be paying tax in the country anyway. I pay tax in my country of residence and where my business affairs are taken care of. This might be an incentive for some people but (and I might be missing the point) I can’t see how it is going to attract any more digital nomads.

Milos Radojevic
Guest
Milos Radojevic

Zac, this is partially true. If you work here, and not pay local tax, (or you lie that worked in Serbia), technically you are evading money to Serbia. This is almost true for any country, but many nomads do that as they cannot be caught in it, there is no way currently to enforce it. If you say that you worked in Germany, for example, you will have to pay tax to Germany. (To have money legalized). But if you earn fair enough, and you are from Germany, by coming here 90 days in 180 days, you will be able… Read more »

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JJ
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JJ

Milos, could you please leave some relevant links to substantiate what you are claiming here? In order for a natural person (nomad or not) to be liable for taxes in a country, they generally need to stay there for 183 days in a year. This is true for Serbia, too – unless there were some changes to the tax code that I’m not aware of – and for Germany. In Croatia, this is 183 days over two years. I would consult a lawyer or accountant before blindly publishing anything like this in the future, at least to clarify what’s really… Read more »

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