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Way back in 2015, in partnership with Emergent Research, Intuit estimated that about 3.2 million Americans were regularly working as “providers” in the on-demand economy. If you’re reading this site, chances are you’re one of us: freelancers or soloprenuers working for yourself or holding down a side hustle in addition to a 9-5. Their 2020 survey forecasted that by that year, 7.6 million Americans (more than double the number increased in just five years).

Who is an “On-Demand” Provider?

Basically it’s someone as described above, yet 79% of respondents claim their on-demand activity is part-time. More and more folks are using the opportunity to make money on the side to support making a living in other ways than just a typical 9-5. It’s the freelancer writer working in the coffee shop; the digital nomad running drop shipping sites in Chiang Mai, Thailand; or consultants hosting trainings and workshops virtually.

It’s also anyone who’s driving rideshare, renting airbnb’s and now, even Amazon’s gotten into the game by offering ways to become your own “last mile” delivery service.

Why is this happening?

Well, first and foremost, this isn’t caused by immigrants stealing jobs. The role that immigrants play in the American workforce is essential as they fill all the jobs that most citizens wouldn’t ever consider. For far too long, American culture has been to send everyone to higher education (at any cost), promising white collar dreams of cushy perk filled corporate gigs.

Few could have anticipated that even those who experience conventional career “success” are often left unsatisfied with their jobs. It’s not just the steep drop in employer provided pensions (from 60% of full time workers in 1982 to barely 14% of full time workers in 2015) or the ballooning duration of unemployment (from 8.5 weeks in 1980 to over 82 weeks in 2015).

The collision of advancements in A.I. and mobile technology, growth of a global trading market and a focus on fulfillment rather than pay has lead to many escape overly bureaucratic corporations. Even Bloomberg is reporting that around 3.56 million workers left positions this past May. That brings the quits rate to a 17 year high of 2.4% – a number that measures those who quit as a share of employed people.

The post No, You’re Not Going Crazy…Everyone Is Quitting Their Job was first published on Coworkaholic.

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